MUSC Health Florence Receives National Recognition for Lactation Care

The International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE®) and International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) have recognized MUSC Health Florence Medical Center for excellence in lactation care.

The MUSC Health Women’s Pavilion received the IBCLC Care Award in recognition for staffing professionals who hold the prestigious International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC®) certification and providing a lactation program for breastfeeding families. In addition, the Women’s Pavilion demonstrated it recently completed activities that help protect, promote, and support breastfeeding.

“It is truly an honor to be one of three hospitals in the state to be awarded the IBCLC Care Award for 2021 and receive global recognition from the International Board of Lactation Consultant examiners (IBCLC) and the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) for providing lactation services that improve long term health of our community,” said Catherine Godwin, Director of MUSC Health – Women’s Pavilion.

MUSC Health Florence Medical Center Perinatal Services implemented the evidence-based initiative of “Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding” along with an extensive education program for our medical providers, nurses, and the community in order to improve breastfeeding outcomes in the community.  We are committed to providing professional lactation support as an integral part of our maternal-child services.

 “At MUSC Health, changing what’s possible begins with the appropriate resources to help with each family’s breastfeeding journey. Our patients are what drives us to provide outstanding care. This award helps identify IBCLC professionals and ensures families have the support they need,”

Lela Gregg IBCLC, BCHC

Marin Skariah, MSN, FNP-BC, RNC-MNN, C-EFM, IBCLC, and Chair of the Board of IBLCE, recently said, “Institutions that are awarded the IBCLC Care Award have dedicated their efforts to promote and provide a lactation program that makes expert assistance available when the breastfeeding family needs it. Through the presentation of this Award, IBLCE honors the work of IBCLCs around the world as they strive to advance global public health by providing expert lactation care to families and by promoting breastfeeding care to other healthcare professionals through advocacy and training.”

IBCLCs focus on preventive care, so they are available during pregnancy to assess and provide information on how to successfully initiate breastfeeding. They continue that assistance after the baby is born by helping families overcome breastfeeding challenges, providing accurate information, and continuing to support them as their baby grows. They assist families returning to work or school, help families in more unusual situations such as breastfeeding more than one baby or nursing a sick or premature infant, and help train nursing staff to manage basic breastfeeding care.

According to Sabeen Adil, MD, IBCLC, and President of ILCA, “IBCLCs work tirelessly in all corners of the globe to help parents provide optimal nutrition to their children. We are proud to recognize some of these IBCLCs through the IBCLC Care Award, which highlights the significant contributions of IBCLCs to improving global health outcomes at the local level.”

As allied health care professionals with the leading internationally recognized certification for professional lactation services, IBCLC professionals work in hospitals and birthing centers, clinics, public health agencies, private practice, community settings, government agencies, and in research. There are currently more than 33,400 such professionals in 125 countries and territories worldwide that are IBCLCs (www.iblce.org). The IBCLC certification program is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA).  NCCA accreditation represents a mark of quality for certification programs.

In addition to finding IBCLC professionals at MUSC Health Florence Women’s Pavilion, families can also find an IBCLC near them by visiting www.ilca.org. Follow the “Find a Lactation Consultant” link and search for an IBCLC by postal code, city and state, or country.   

For more information call the MUSC Health Women’s Pavilion at 843-674-4608, or for information about the IBCLC Care Award program, contact IBLCE at award@iblce.org.   

About MUSC

The MUSC Health Florence Division consists of MUSC Health – Florence and Marion Medical Centers and the employed physicians of each hospital. Both hospitals and entities are a part of the MUSC family.

As the clinical health system of the Medical University of South Carolina, MUSC Health is dedicated to delivering the highest quality patient care available, while training generations of competent, compassionate health care providers to serve the people of South Carolina and beyond. Comprising some 1,600 beds, more than 100 outreach sites, the MUSC College of Medicine, the physicians’ practice plan, and nearly 325 telehealth locations, MUSC Health owns and operates eight hospitals situated in Charleston, Chester, Florence, Lancaster and Marion counties. In 2020, for the sixth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Health the No. 1 hospital in South Carolina. To learn more about clinical patient services, visit muschealth.org.

MUSC and its affiliates have collective annual budgets of $3.2 billion. More than 17,000 MUSC team members include world-class faculty, physicians, specialty providers and scientists who deliver groundbreaking education, research, technology and patient care.

 

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